Archive for Camp X

Open Doors

Alexander Graham Bell once said, “When one door closes another door opens…”, and people have been quoting these words ever since. Often, those “open doors” lead to interesting and exciting opportunities or adventures. Such is the case across Ontario this season. Doors Open Ontario 2016 offers you the opportunity to discover the story behind every door.

DOORS OPEN 2016

Each year from April to October, the Ontario Heritage Trust invites you to explore Ontario’s heritage treasures at  free public events across the province.

“For 15 years, the Ontario Heritage Trust and its partners have provided opportunities for Ontarians to learn about their rich history and diverse cultures by experiencing our heritage at Doors Open Ontario events. This year, we are shedding light on places associated with medical science and innovation. Hospitals, universities, laboratories, medical schools and museums are participating in Doors Open Ontario and telling the story that medicine has played in our lives. We invite you to explore these and other engaging aspects of our history, identity and cultural heritage at events across the province!” – Thomas H.B. Symons, Chair, Ontario Heritage Trust

“Since it began, Doors Open Ontario has allowed millions of people to glimpse into some of our province’s most fascinating cultural sites. Not only does the program boost local economies, but it also raises awareness of and interest in heritage conservation. I encourage Ontarians and visitors to get out and discover the unique story and experience waiting behind every door.” – Michael Coteau, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

This year we are fortunate that four of the 43 free events happen right here in the Durham Region.

Saturday May 7th, 2016 found Whitby opening doors to sixteen historical sites including The Carnegie Library Building, Intrepid Park – Camp X Memorial  and Station Gallery. You may recall that even Trafalgar Castle School allowed Mincom Jo access to its hallowed halls.

Trafalgar Castle

Clarington opened its doors on June 11, 2016 to fifteen diverse locations. The Massey Building, Ebor House and the Durham Masonic Lodge were all part of the event.  Mincom Jo was able to take in three locations – Richard Varcoe House, St. George’s Anglican Church and Rosemary’s Gardens. Contrary to what one might have expected, no ill came of Jo entering the church. It was worth the risk to see the two Tiffany of New York windows, at each end of the church.

TIFFANY WINDOWS

Mincom Jo & Her Aunt Pat Were Moved To Tears By The Tiffany Windows In St. George’s Anglican Church

Rosemary’s Gardens was perhaps our Jo’s favourite stop. Located at 215 Mill St. South in Newcastle, it would be easy to pass by and comment on what a lovely home and garden this is without really knowing the secret beauty hidden behind the gate. These gardens have twice won top recognition for Ward 4 in the Clarington Blooms contest.

Rosemarys Garden 1

Rosemarys Garden 2

Rosemarys Garden 3

It’s not too late to cross over some mysterious thresholds in the Durham Region. Both Ajax and Oshawa will be unlocking doors on Saturday, October 1st, 2016. Click on the town names to find out what is available and make a day of it. Go behind doors that may normally be closed to the public and satisfy your curiosity. Doors Open Ontario is letting you in!

 

 

Reflections In Durham

Nov. 1st, 2014. It is grey, wet and cold. Really cold. The last reported temperature was 2° C.  Looking around at the people gathered at Cullen Central Park in Whitby, it doesn’t seem to bother anyone. There is a sizable crowd of people of all ages. Everyone is bundled up appropriately with one common adornment — a poppy. A piper begins to play his bagpipes and a brigade band joins in. Everyone stands as we watch a procession of representatives from the Canadian Armed Forces, Ontario’s First Responder community (Police, Fire, EMS) and government officials enter the area. We are all here on behalf of The Wounded Warriors of Canada to witness the unveiling of the Park of Reflections.

PARK OF REFLECTION ENTERThe Park of Reflections is “a living Tribute to all of Canada’s uniformed service personnel and their families who have served internationally or domestically, and as a result of their service, became ill or were injured in the line of duty. The park’s design symbolizes and augments their journey back to health. It represents the sacrifice of those in uniform and of their families, made in the cause of Peace and Freedom. The Park of Reflection is a place for Canadians to reflect and remember the cost of service for all of Canada’s uniformed service members — serving or retired — and their families.”


The Park of Reflection is the creation of Daimian Boyne – a Canadian Armed Forces Veteran and Whitby resident.

BILL BLAIR DAMIAN BOYNEThe people of the Durham Region support and are honoured to have this beautiful park located in the heart of Whitby.  Historically, the Durham Region has played a big part in supporting Canada’s Service men and women.  In Oshawa, on Stevenson Road North, The Ontario Regiment Museum  is located. There you will find Canada’s largest collection of operational military vehicles. On Simcoe Street, the The R.S. McLaughlin Armoury celebrated 100 years of history in Oshawa earlier this year.

Did you know about Camp X? Right here in The Durham Region. Camp X stood in the area we now know as  Intrepid Park in Whitby. Created in 1941 by Sir William Stephenson, also known as “A Man Called Intrepid”, this place became the training ground for real “Secret Agents” from around the world.  In fact, Ian Flemming, the creator of the “007” franchise based his stories on research he did at Camp X.  A recent documentary called, “About Camp X: Secret Agent School“, on the History Channel did a remarkable job of unfolding the importance of Camp X in training agents. It is well worth the watch.  Perhaps one of the most knowledgeable people about Camp X  is Lynn Philip Hodgson who wrote the book, “Inside Camp X” and he actually gives walking tours of the property.
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